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Unix Security

Release Date: 2014-01
Bsd_01_2014-1
Rating: 2 votes

Articles

  • BSD 1/2014 Free Issue to Download! [epub]

  • BSD 1/2014 Free Issue to Download! [pdf]

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  • Nmap: How to Use it

    Nmap stands for “Network Mapper”. It’s been seen in many films like the Matrix Reloaded, Bourne Ultimatum, Die Hard 4, etc. When Nmap was created, it could only be used on the Linux Platform but now it supports all the major OSes like Linux, UNIX, Windows, and Mac OS platforms. Sahil will teach you how to use it and why you should start.


  • How to Use The Mac OS X Hackers Toolbox

    When you think of an operating system to run pen testing tools on, you probably think of Linux and more specifically, BackTrack Linux. BackTrack Linux is a great option and one of the most common platforms for running pen testing tools. If you are a Mac user, then you would most likely run a virtual machine of BackTrack Linux. In this article, Philip is going to take you through the installation and configuration of some of the most popular and useful hacking tools, such as Metasploit, on Mac OS X. If you are interested in maximizing the use of your Mac for pen testing and running your tools natively, then you should find this article helpful.


  • Basic Unix Queuing Techniques

    It occasionally happens that our incoming or outgoing data cannot be processed as it is generated or, for some reason, we choose to process it at a later time.
    A typical example might be a client-server system, where it is necessary to queue the socket descriptors of incoming connections because of some limit on the number of active processes, or a message hub, which accepts data synchronously, but must rely on other processes to remove the data asynchronously. Apart from the numerous commercially-available third party implementations of queuing systems, Unix has two highly efficient queuing mechanisms, which can be used for extremely low overhead systems of queues. Read the Mark article to fidn out how Unix Queuing Techniques work.


  • How Secure can Secure Shell (SSH) be?

    This article is the third part of the series on OpenSSH and configurations and includes tricks which make using the protocol more secure. Arkadiusz, in his article, concentrates on Virtual Private Networks supported by OpenSSH.


  • Unix Interprocess Communication Using Shared Memory

    A shared memory segment is a section of RAM, whose address is known to more than one process. The processes to which this address is known, have either read only, or read/write permission to the memory segment, whose access rights are set in the manner used by chmod.


  • Sniffing and Recovering Network Information Using Wireshark

    Wireshark is a free and open-source packet analyzer. It is used for network troubleshooting, analysis, software and communications protocol development, as well as education. Wireshark is cross-platform, using the GTK+ widget toolkit to implement its user interface and pcap to capture packets, it runs on various Unix-like operating systems including Linux, OS X, BSD, Solaris, and on Microsoft Windows. Fotis will show how easy it is to obtain sensitive data from snooping on a connection. The best way to prevent this is to encrypt the data that’s being sent. The most known encryption methods are SSL (Secure Sockets Layer) and TLS (Transport Layer Security).


  • Dynamic Memory Allocation in Unix Systems

    It is not always possible, at compile time, to know how big to make all of our data structures. When we send an SQL query to the database, it may return twenty million rows, or it may return one.


  • Column

    Technology makes a wonderful slave but a cruel master. Both Amazon and
    Tesco, major retailers in the UK and worldwide have been severely criticised in
    the media for the use of technology to control and monitor staff excessively. As
    IT professionals, where do we draw the ethical line in the sand?


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