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Run FreeBSD as NAT Instance in Cloud

Release Date: 2012-11
Bsd_11_2012_
Rating: 20 votes

Issue_contents

  • NETGEAR Universal Wifi Adapter (WNCE2001)
  • Automating the Deployment of FreeBSD & PC-BSD Systems
  • Network Concepts, Routing and Firewalls
  • FreeBSD as a NAT Instance in Amazon Cloud
  • FreeBSD Enterprise Search with Apache Solr
  • PostgreSQL: Indexes
  • Articles

    • Free Issue to Download! BSD 11/2012

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    • NETGEAR Universal Wifi Adapter

      The trend towards increased internet connectivity of media devices (TV’s, gaming consoles, DVR’s) has brought a work-around for one of few my frustrations with BSD operating systems – the limited support for newer wireless adapters. Many of these media devices have an ethernet port, but no way to attach a wireless adapter. Several companies have stepped up to this opportunity and have created universal wireless adapters that connect to the ethernet port rather than an expansion port. Since the device connects to the ethernet port, no driver is needed. Since no driver is needed, these devices should work with BSD operating systems. In this article, I will test Netgear’s Universal Wifi Adapter, model WNCE2001.


    • Automating the Deployment of FreeBSD and PC-BSD Systems

      In PC-BSD 9.x every installation is fully-scripted, due to the the pc-sysinstall backend. This backend can also be used to quickly automate the deployment of FreeBSD servers and PC-BSD desktops using a PXE boot environment. In PC-BSD & TrueOS 9.1 and higher, this functionality is easy to setup and deploy using the “pc-thinclient” utility. PXE booting allows you to boot systems via the LAN interface, as opposed to using traditional media, such as DVD or USB. In order for clients to boot via PXE they will need a PXE capable network adapter.


    • Network Concepts, Routing and Firewalls

      This article is aimed at anyone who wants to learn more about networking, routers and firewalls. We will discuss this topic in terms of a BSD/PF firewall/router.


    • FreeBSD as a NAT Instance in Amazon Cloud

      Amazon VPC lets you launch instances in a virtual network that closely resembles a traditional network that you might operate in your own data center. You place publicly accessible servers (for example, web servers, DNS server etc.) into a public-facing subnet, and place your backend systems (databases, application servers etc.) in a private subnet with no Internet access. Instances in the private subnet can access the Internet only by routing their traffic through a NAT instance in a public subnet. This article is intended for beginners wanting to install and run FreeBSD as a NAT instance in Amazon Virtual Private Cloud (Amazon VPC).


    • PostgreSQL: Indexes (Part 2)

      This article continues the previous one, presenting the readers with a few index examples and how the access costs are computed by the query planner. All the examples shown here have been tested on a PostgreSQL 9.1 cluster running on a FreeBSD 8.2-RELEASE machine; all the example source code are available in a GitHub repository.


    • FreeBSD Enterprise Search with Apache Solr (Part 3)

      One of the important facets of enterprise search is to be able to search internal (Intranet) and external websites. On a smaller scale, it is relatively trivial to assemble some code in PHP or Perl to pull web pages from a site, extract the links from the HTML and then “wash, rinse, repeat”. The difficulty arises when we want to index, rank, and effectively manage these results on a large scale. Almost 10 years ago, Apache Nutch was developed as the key technology to crawl 100 million webpages, and has proved time and again that it is an efficient scalable solution. Nutch can be clustered, it is robots.txt friendly, and using modular plug-ins ans schemas, can be tuned to bias certain results first. While Nutch integration and tuning is quite specialized, it is fairly trivial to configure Nutch to dump results of a crawl session into MySQL (or any other JDBC based database for that matter), and rank / review these queries in Solr.


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